NOTE: This is a full archive for the Project Community: You & The World (2013) please see the main site for the most up to date information.

Posts From Group 3
Once this group convenes and develops its project focus and team name, this will tell you more about this group.

-Solving the unmet need of funding-

The foundation my group is working with concentrates on preserving the storytelling tradition in Curacao. Their main unmet need for the NGO was fundraising so we tried to concentrate on expanding their networks and use crowdfunding to find as many sponsors as possible.
During the last weeks we learned a lot about crowdsourcing, Technology Stewardship, Marketing and working in teams. I think all these topics were very important for me in order to be able to think of a complete working solution-suggestion for the NGO. Of cause the final solution plan for the NGO includes all of these aspects and as I said every lesson was helpful to achieve the solution plan we have figured out now.

But crowdfunding was definitely the most important part of it. To use crowdfunding means raising capital from many individuals who belief in your idea, each making small donations that adds up to a lot. Before this course I had heard about crowdfunding but I was not aware of the actual way a foundation could use it and I didn’t know how close it is connected to crowdsourcing.
But why is crowdfunding so important to the NGO?
crowdfunding will help the NGO not only to raise money but also to expand their network, which is the second unmet need of the Gogorobi Foundation.
Crowdfunding is a big part of our final suggestion-plan for Gogorobi and since crowdfunding is closely related to crowdsourcing we were able to cover both their unmet needs with our strategy! I would like to give an example showing the connection between Crowdsourcing and Crowdfunding. We advice the NGO to join the website Globalgiving.org. It is a website to raise money especially for Nongovernmental organizations. But in order to become a long term member and to make a profit from the popularity of the website the NGO has to pass an open challenge. They have to find sponsors and show that they are able to use online networks to expand and reach new communities. The suggestions (e.g. website improvements, using new online networks) will help the Gogogrobi foundation to pass this challenge.
The end goal should be to reach as many new communities as possible to gain more popularity and as a result to find more donators. A key role to success will be the foundation itself. They have to build up and maintain the communities we want to reach with our suggestion-plan. If they start to use online networks they have to put in a lot of effort and time in it, so that it will be as effective as possible.


We as a group can only provide as many information and strategies as possible that we think could work to achieve the end goal. The final video will include many details and exact steps the foundation should follow. I think it would also be very helpful to talk to our contact person Sheila Payne from the foundation after sending her the video to answer questions or to explain some things in more detail. The suggestions we come up with will be a start for the NGO to rethink their current online network status and also to start new projects by using crowdfunding and more online networks to expand their communities.

Posted in Community, Group 3
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: le trait de génie de lucie

Evolve’s Approach to the Briefing

Since we received the briefing to come up with suggestions for Gogorobí’s fundraising and network expansion, this is what Evolve team worked on:

1. Storytelling tradition of Curaçao & Caribe
We did a research on Gogorobí’s context which helped us to find out more about their purpose, limitations and story. This was a priority for us to make sure we understand the traditions that led us to take the next steps in order to suggest relevant strategies.

2. Preservation, conservation and promotion
We also learned about Crowdsourcing and Crowdfunding which are very important to Gogorobí’s since it aims not only Preservation, conservation and promotion of the Storytelling tradition but also Fundraising and Network Expansion. We came to the conclusion that maybe Gogorobí’s concern about Preservation, Conservation and Promotion is limiting their activities to a local environment. If the organization wants step out of their local interaction certainly it should focus on Crowdsourcing and Crowdfunding benefits to spread it widely.

3. Gogorobí’s expansion research
We analyzed Gogorobí’s current situation (reputation, popularity, expressions) and discussed the possible solutions. The first suggestion would be to improve their online platforms. This can be done by using a bigger variety of social networks and keep its informations constantly up to date. Then people can find Gogorobí on different contexts and choose the best way to connect with them. Also it is important to connect with other organizations that share the same or similar goals.

4. Crowdsourcing Suggestions
We did some research on how a story can be presented to a community and also how we can involve the people to…Taking into account the main goals and activities of the foundation, we have selected the storytelling part to work on. After this our job was to understand how networks work and can be helpful, then find out which one fits Gogorobí best. One of our suggestions is the website ‘Storify’, which can be used as a platform to spread stories about the traditional caribbean traditions Gogorobí works after.

Today, when we’re close to the deadline, it is nice that we had the opportunity to reflect on our work and speed up to the end result. This consisted in summing up all the information we have in one document and start working on it as a presentation so we easily visualize a storyboard for our end result, which is going to be a video. We’ve decided on the video idea since the beggining. Our goal is to present our development and final ideas in an easy, attractive way to the client. We’re also very worried about suggesting effective ideas which fit Gogorobí’s environment, and the video is a good way for representing it to them.

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Posted in Community, Group 3
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Mondayly by Fer

The beginning of the end?

You could say this monday was the most nerve-racking day so far. A lot came to us, both for personal branding but also for Project Communities. I see that we are making a lot of progress in the group so that was a relief! Everything is coming together and we are finishing up lots of loose ends.

This weeks blog will be about the usefulness I see in crowdsourcing and crowdfunding. As ive researched a lot about these subjects (never heard of them before) I learned a lot about them, and that its applied in a lot of things I use myself. I believe that crowdsourcing and crowdfunding is an amazingly useful tool to gain knowledge and money. First of all, it’s free. Most of the time though. How good is that? And you get so many different views which makes the variety of it all so wide and interesting. Because social media has been and still is growing so much and fast, this is also a developing tool. You could think of so many ways to use crowdsourcing ideas, also by making it fun and interesting for everyone. This is something ive really become to realise in the last few weeks, and I really find it cool to think about ways to apply it in our own assignment; the Gogorobi foundation. I am now researching and exploring the African storytelling part of our project, and a bit about a possible radio station for this and the general storytelling. This is where it comes in handy to know about the ways to use crowdfunding and crowdsourcing. 

Here’s an example I read about on the internet and find very interesting;

McDonald’s: Back in 2007, McDonalds held a “Global Casting” contest to get images of real people to be used on all cups and bags. They received 13,000 entries and chose 24 faces to be rolled out on all packagings worldwide, starting with the United States and Canada. The same year, in Australia, McDonald’s asked local consumers to create and name a burger when “burger naming legend” Ken Thomas retired from McDonald’s Autralia. They finally chose McOZ (“Aussie“), but the burger is not being sold anymore, says Wikipedia.

In France the McDonald’s logo is green! This is a sign to show the company’s sustainability efforts, and this positioning was also the topic of a graphic design and photo contest held in France in 2010, by which the company wanted to know how to best communicate its sustainability policy. Recently, McDonald’s has had huge success crowdsourcing new burger ideas with its initiative Mein Burger (“My Burger“) in Germany. People could come up with ideas and design their own burger via McDonalds.de, where a visual product configurator was available to play with. They got over 116,000 submitted burgers and 1,5 million votes on the page, and received a lot of praise from the specialized marketing press! 

this is just an example which inspires me. I think it will be very useful for our designing career as well. As for now i cannot find any real disadvantages from crowdsourcing. Maybe that you’re not sure how reliabe the information is? 

well this is it for now! untill next week! 

Posted in Community, Group 3
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: The 3rd Project

Monday #5 – We do not worry because crowdfunding does work

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This Monday was about speeding up. For both Personal Branding and Project Community we were asked to start working directly on the end results. At first, thinking about how it should look like, made me feel surprised, almost nervous. After having a second thought I realized the right way is to think of how it is probably going to look like with what you have done so far. Then I felt prepared. I was probably feeling nervous for a second because I’m a little overwhelmed with the idea of designing my personal brand and also having a real client. But the speeding up feel enables you to let go of “so many ideas” or “so much work to do” and just start to deal with the facts. Today when Maarthen talked about “killing your darlings” this is exactly what I did. I gave up on almost every “little plans/ideas” and started facing that this is it. This could only happen, of course, because I’ve been “doing the homework” and am partially prepared. Speeding up can cause a negative impact on your mind, but only when it’s not prepared. When you have what you need “in hand” or almost all of it, it can become surprisingly good and motivating.

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Otherwise the only fact to deal with is that you need to rush from the beggining, which puts you in a disavantage position.

So today’s rushing gave me a good energy. Good for me. It means I’m opened to it and giving my best. Still, in the beggining of Project Community’s class I was worried about how would the team’s energy be.

As a large group we have to exchange energy in order to sync our tasks. Turns out today we were faster because we knew we had to split in our subteams and it should work. We were all a little nervous individually, but sharing the “overwhelm” and “rush” feeling, made the load not so heavy after all. We agree that we just need to stop, focus and move on without what we got up to this moment. Which I personally see as a research of good quality. Not a finished one, but we’ll manage to do so. From today to the weekend it is our homework to justify it better and come to specific conclusions. I’m expecting and believing we’ll have a good result.

Crowdsourcing, Design and our NGO’s case

Designers can find in crowdfunding a very familiar and favorable process. The creativity we need will hardly come up if  we’re thinking  ”alone”. But is necessary to learn how to balance individual and collective contribution.

Today I stumbled upon this article relating that film & Video projects raised almost $60 million in pledged support over the last year. It also said that documentaries were the highest pledged film subcategory, raising over $42 million in 2012. Some films even became featured at festivals across the world and got shortlisted for Academy Awards. Here is the link to the article: http://tinyurl.com/npt9ycl

Emma Dessau, who wrote this article, spoke to teams from three documentaries that exceeded their fundraising goals on Kickstarter in 2012. They are “Money for Nothing”, “The Waiting Room” and “I’m a Big Bird”. She wanted to learn moreabout their experiences running campaigns. Here I will explain what I’ve learned about Crowdsourcing so far by using their quotes and some of my own thoughts on it. In the end, I’ll link all of it to our NGO, Gogorobí, and its relation to networks.

Jim Bruce, Money For Nothing: Inside the Federal Reserve: Prepare extensively for your campaign before launching it – especially by identifying and developing relationships with 3rd parties who already have a connection to your core audience. The main reason our campaign was successful was that we had some really fantastic allies – people like John Mauldin and Doug Kass, for example, who write about investing for large online audiences who are very interested in the story of the Federal Reserve. So when John and Doug spread the word about our film we were able to connect with a huge number of potential donors and introduce our project to the future audience for our film.

Kickstarter can be an incredibly effective way to forge a relationship with your core audience and create a lot of awareness about your film, but it can also be a very stressful and time-consuming process. So the most important thing is to do as much work as possible in advance of launching your campaign so that you aren’t overwhelmed by the process of the campaign itself.

What can be inferred from that as a lesson is that not seeking the input of other designers or end users isolates your creation, which can be awesome, but will often aquire no value.

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The human brain will often ignore aspects that other minds, which don’t have the same worries or distractions, can see.

Dave LaMattino, I Am Big Bird: We were amazed by the feedback we got… It was like having mini test screenings every time we released a clip. We learned what people connected with, which actually has informed and shaped the rest of the filmmaking process. A lot of times when you’re working on a film like this, you’re trapped in a dark room without the ability to get important critical feedback. Having people comment on these clips throughout the campaign was one of many unexpected benefits of Kickstarter.

When a project is crowdsourced, the first important aspect for who is launching the project is to stablish a PURPOSE and properly set the roles. If people are going to join your idea, you don’t want them to bring bad influences. They’re very likely to negatively influence a situation in which they don’t know what / how they’re supposed to contribute with.

The second is to find ways to explain it in a transparent way. Cultivation for a project is exactly like the “candle effect”: one person gets excited and tell the other, who also gets excited and tell others, so on and so on. If there is no noise in the communication of an idea, it will light the right people. It means the idea will be supported and also spread.

Pete Nicks, The Waiting Room: Kickstarter is much more than a funding platform. It is a way to gather true believers – fans & backers – around the project. Because in the world of social media it is not how many fans you have. It is the quality of them. And at the beginning of the project it is incredibly valuable to have a critical mass of supporters around you who can help not just by giving you $50, but by being evangelists, connecters and emotional supporters.

The best way to approach Kickstarter campaign is to think beyond money. Think of it more like the creation of a super-board-of-directors for your project. Be prepared to dive into that group and solicit ideas, follow their wisdom, draw from their inspiration. The money should always be secondary.

The idea has been spread, recognized and well interpreted. Here’s when all the crowd magic starts to take place. This is when people’s contribution will consist of insights and other forms of constructive feedback. For this moment again it is very important that the person/company is prepared to all the information to come and direct it in the right way. The results should performed in the best way and the process communicated as well.

Clay Frost, I Am Big Bird: Be flexible with your rewards and be willing to shape them during the campaign to meet the demand of your backers. Find a way to give them what they want, which might not always be what you thought they’d want when you started your campaign.  If you can do this, you can capitalize on the interest.

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Seeing the crowdsourcing alternative from Gogorobí’s point of view is interesting. They have a consistent purpose, awesome ideas and projects, but a narrow field of action. Widening it doesn’t mean you need to lose focus or identity, but that you need to communicate not just the way you usually do but specifically seeking for people simpathy/empathy.

I believe Gogorobí’s only on the first step of communication. It knows its goal and expresses in a unique, authentic way. However it does not imply that their communication stands out or is effective.

As its about storytelling and traditions, I see an opportunity for Gogorobí with crowdsourcing if they find ways to tell this stories in a variety of platforms. The african tradition attracts the simpathy of people all around the world and it is just a matter of telling a story the right way. It means the stories should be on the right timing, in the right place.

Finding out these answers is not that hard once you have a close, transparent communication. Gogorobí’s website is still only available in the dutch language and their social networks aren’t always up to date. Once they realize how easy and natural it is, starting to play with the crowdsourcing magic will also come naturally. I hope that is the fire we’re setting in their ideas. Can’t wait to see it happen :)

Posted in Community, Group 3
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Mondayly by Fer

“We’re Better Together!”

This week in project communities we have been learning about Crowdfunding. Specifically what crowdfunding is, what the strengths and weaknesses are and exploring the potential options for using it with our NGO, Gogorobi.

So what is crowdfunding? In simple terms crowdfunding happens when there is an idea that someone or an organisation believe in but don’t have the finances to carry the idea through. Therefore they advertise their idea through various sources and hope to gain the support from other people, who then in turn will give a donation to help fund this idea and make it a reality.

So once we had found out what crowdfunding was, we then had more questions, including “how do you do it? Where do you do it? What’s the success rate?” So we started doing some research. At first there seemed to be hundreds of different websites that were promoting crowdfunding, but as we looked closer it became more apparent that each crowdfunding website was for mainly a specific sector type. So as a team we decided to come up with the top 3 that we could use, specifically relevant to our NGO.

The three that we came up with were Global Giving, Indigogo and Kickstarter. Each of these had their strengths and weaknesses. For example Kickstarter has become the most popular site for funding projects therefore would bring the highest site traffic. However it is limited to projects only based in the UK and US. Indigogo is not restricted to certain countries and actively seeks diverse projects, however if the NGO doesn’t make the target amount they are searching for then they will have to pay more for advertising on the site. The final option that we decided up was Global Giving. Firstly this was because this website was specifically for charity based organisations and not anyone with an idea trying to get funding. Also because before you can become a fully pledged non-profit partner, you have to take part in a ‘Gateway Challenge’. This challenge means that you will get training on how to use the online fundraising tools, using different techniques like tapping into social media, online communication, mapping, building giving networks and campaign planning. However you will only have 4 weeks in which to raise £2,000 from 50 donors. If this cannot be completed then you cannot become a fully pledged member. This is the site that I believe we are going to be pitching to our NGO for the ‘fundraising’ aspect of the brief that they have given us as it seems to be absolutely invaluable for what we are looking for.

However there is still the ‘Network Expansion’ that we still haven’t talked about that was also in the brief. For this particular part of the brief we are going to be using a tool called Crowdsourcing. So for anyone who hasn’t read my previous blogs, “Crowdsourcing is the practice of obtaining needed services, ideas, or content by soliciting contributions from a large group of individuals, especially within the online community”. I feel that this explanation is pretty self-explanatory of what crowdsourcing actually is, however I feel that it doesn’t give true meaning to how powerful this tool is. This week I felt that we took a massive step in the right direction as Viktorija and myself came up with a strategy for the network expansion, which we hope will directly affect the crowdsourcing that needs to be done for our NGO. We came up with a 4 step strategy that consisted of 1 – Establish a base of networks (including all popular social media), 2 – Connect all of these networks together so that they are all linked, 3 – Maintain them and keep the content up to date, 4 – Crowdsource, share and keep the network expanding so more people can get involved, to give more ideas and in turn hopefully crowdfund.. This strategy does go into a lot more detail but these are the overview of the steps we are going to be taking to complete the ‘network expansion’ strategy.

It is easy to see the appeal of crowdfunding, it seems like the perfect idea. You have a brilliant idea and not the cash to put it into action, so you use crowdfunding to gain the capital that you need to progress and market the idea and put it into production (from a product sense). However there are some designers who do ‘go it alone’ and personally I can see the justification for it from a designer’s point of view. I have this view for a few reasons, the first one is the most powerful point which is copyright. Imagine you’ve come up with a revolutionary new idea copyrighted and patented, but you need to crowdfund to gain the capital to produce and launch it. However this new idea that no one would have even thought about is now out in the open for all to see and for anyone to improve on. Therefore anyone could improve your idea and copyright it and then if they actually have the finance to go through with it, get it out in the market and make money from your idea! This is the main point that I am passionate about because my girlfriends grandfather Dimitrios Papadopoulos is an inventor and this actually happened to him when he came up with the idea for a new type of scaffolding. One of his investors slightly tweaked and improved the idea he had come up with and then made A LOT of money from selling it as his own. He is probably currently sipping a cocktail on a beach somewhere, living the life as it were, off the back of someone else’s invention and ingenious.

Secondly I feel that if an investor wanted to put a lot of capital into a certain designers idea, I feel that the idea itself might lose its roots that it initially came from. For example a designer could come up with an idea to help the masses. However if they don’t have the capital to see it through themselves then when an investor gets involved it may change from a idea to help the masses to a money making scheme.

On the other hand I would like to say that am not completely bias and not a fool. I can definitely see the huge benefits of designers crowdfunding, and there has been many success stories from this. One of which was actually done on Kickstarter called ‘Star Citizen’. This is a video game design that needed $500,000 but has currently raised £18,000,000.

Crowdsourcing in design however I feel is a different matter. When talking about this I would break it up into two sections, crowdsourcing actual designs and crowdsourcing help for designs. I actually didn’t realise how big this tool was until I started researching it. I find it incredible in the sense that there are websites specifically designed for crowdsourcing design ideas. One of the websites that I found when researching was called Crowd Spring (http://www.crowdspring.com/). This is specifically for logos, graphic and naming. However it boasts that there has been over 4.5 million entries of design ‘job’s’ of which for each job there is on average 129 entries of designs. From this the company that made the job, chooses the best design and pays the person who made it. In the case of needing design jobs done I feel that this is an incredible tool as you pull collective knowledge together and choose the best ideas that suit you and only pay the people that were involved with the design. The only con of this route is that it may take a month to get an idea from the 129 people that you are crowdsourcing from.

On the other hand crowdsourcing in design can also be interpreted as needing advise or help from the wider community that is involved with that specific industry. For this I feel that the main tool that helps people is Forums and Blogs. This means pulling together collective knowledge on a certain subject, from many different experts who have their own opinions and ideas on how to help with a problem and reaching a conclusive answer. The only con of this would be that it may take a while for someone with the correct knowledge or correct answer to reply. Also that there may be a lot of white noise, with a lot of people trying to help but not actually knowing the right answers that you need.

So until next week… :)

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Posted in Community, Group 3
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Mikey Taylor's Innovation HQ

Are you sure you want to rely on “the wisdom of the crowd”?

Engaging crowd in order to achieve ones goal is indeed great idea, whether you’re looking of a product, service or funds. You watch other people uniting in order to help you with your purpose. At the same time you are given feedback on your product or idea. That is how small entrepreneurs enter the market. Personally I find this idea very appealing but I cannot resist the impression that it might have many disadvantages.

Biggest benefit of crowdsourcing is the fact that various people bring in their money, knowledge, experience or simply effort. Therefor e different views on the project are brought to attention. Due to development of online network we are able to connect to more and more people, thus creating larger communities.

As for design I’d say that disadvantage of crowdsourcing is the fact that this is a sort of cheap labor, which is more likely to result in less credible product comparing it to the ones offered by hired professionals. On the other hand  crowdsourcing is less expensive than hiring an expensive designer and it allows many new designer to gain recognition on the market and in many cases it offers many people willing to work anytime. My friend is a great fan of graphic design, yet he never expected to do anything more professional about it, but entering the contest for logo he was discovered and in the end he found a job designing posters.

Crowdsourcing does not assure you finding the solution to your problem or the support you’d excepted, moreover you might be criticized, not in a constructive way as you must include the human factor in your project and people are not always as helpful as you’d wish. It is also difficult to engage collaboration between crowd members as they compete with each other in nature. What is important there’s no contract in most crowdsourcing cases, so people are more likely not to treat it with full devotion.

I haven’t had much experience with the crowdsourcing and funding. But  during this project I gained deeper insight in online crowdsourcing pages, such as Kickstarter or the Globalgiving proved to be successful. What is also common for this websites it that you have to share  some percentage of gathered amount, moreover there is often the system called “ all or nothing”, which means that either you raise the amount you planned in given time or you don’t get anything at all. Search for support for your projects online requires much effort and involvement, for example for Globalgiving you have to provide many documents concerning various matters. 

Posted in Community, Group 3
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: ▲▼▲

McDonald’s and the story of CROWDSOURCING

Let’s go back to 1858. 

A group of scholars created the first oxford English dictionary. It was a huge project and they needed help. So they asked for lots of volunteers to write about different topics according to their expertise and then they put it all together. The point is: relying on the crowd isn’t really a new-fangled idea. But it wasn’t until we all got connected that crowdsourcing came about because of the internet you can reach lots of people very quickly and you can direct and organize their work. It’s a way of solving problems and producing things by connecting online with people from all over the world.

Anyone can use crowdsourcing: Companies, governments, groups and individuals. They can use it to grow their organizations or support their causes.
There are 4 different ways crowdsourcing works: the first enables you to access a large online labor force and identify and select workers. Or you can post your work and let the workers find you. Crowdsourcing provides a platform for designers who wouldn’t otherwise be given a chance to showcase their talents. Another chance of using crowdsourcing in the process of developing ideas, where the Audience can engage in the production process and this can bring a lot of attention.

For the first time in the history of McDonald’s, in 2011 the fans in Germany were able to invent their own burgers and to promote them online via facebook and other social media. The best five burgers were sold in the restaurants throughout Germany. You could say it was a crowdsouced Burger. McDonald’s itself says it was the most successful campaign in Germany ever. They reached every forth German online user and decided to repeat the campaign in 2012.

The crowd creativity can be used to develop original art, media or content and companies can reach diverse and creative people for idea generation and problem solving.

But you have to keep in mind that many designers will participate in the competition and some people regret the loss of quality of the design on websites like 99designs.com or freelancer.com. I would propose to use crowdsourcing in design not for radical innovations because the designers that take part in the online competition do not know what exactly the soul of the company is and how can they create something extraordinary for something they do not exactly know?
But crowdsourcing can definitely be a chance to help connect designers to funders and investors. Connecting with large groups of people via internet to attach expertise, time, knowledge, and resources can help every designer to develop ideas and expand communities. Especially crowdfunding where you can raise capital from many individuals who belief in your idea, each making small donations that adds up to a lot can be seen as a great opportunity to help individuals develop their ideas. But I think you have to be very specific about the project that should be funded, otherwise it will lose attention and drown in the crowd.

The second way of crowdsourcing allows you to ask the crowd and find a solution to a problem. It can support communication and collaboration among distributed groups of people.
A third is when knowledge exists but you need help finding and organizing it and a fourth is when you need ideas from the crowd, opinion and feedback.
As you can see there are different ways you can use crowdsourcing and there are different things you can do with crowdsourcing. Using crowdsourcing in design is cheap, saves time and offers diversity but the quality of design suffers and companies miss out the dialogue with the designers who can’t truly provide for their needs. However, if you want a logo for a simple catalog for your company I think crowdsourcing’s benefits of usefulness and low costs outweigh the quality concerns. It is a good opportunity for small businesses with small resources and can be used as a kickstart.

Posted in Community, Group 3
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: le trait de génie de lucie

Week 6 Crowdfunding

The theme of this week is crowdfunding. Before Project Community classes I didn’t know much about Crowdfunding. Now I understand that it is a very powerful tool. It can help to make the ideas real. I really like the principal how it works. That anyone who has a good idea, but doesn’t have enough money, can publish the project, and people can donate the money to realize it. So, crowdfunding is one of the best ways to make projects in order not to get entangled in debt for the banks.

Furthermore, in this way donators become like a part of the project and they even can buy the first products. It, also, helps to sort out which ideas are worth to become real and which are not. Moreover, crowdfunding may help to promote the organization. For instance, Kckstarter is visited by more than 9 million people per month. So, at the same time it is a powerful platform in order to spread the word about organization.

According to the article written by Ryan Caldbec (forbes.com) already there are more than 500 active crowdfunding platforms. So, we meet the problem which one to choose. Kickstarter is one of the best-known platforms. However, that makes even harder to get financial support because of large competition. So, our team mostly focused on Globalgiving.org platform, which is more oriented on social problems, cultural life and other aspects of it. Moreover, this platform has a good reputation and emphasizes on transparency. These are some of the reasons why we chose this platform. However, after talking with Nancy White we got a very useful advice that we should not stop after choosing only one platform. So, the best way would be to select several crowdunding websites and compare pros and cons of all platforms.

Also, on Monday we had a Google Hangout with the officer from the Fairphone Company. That was really exciting. It was a real life example, how using crowdfunding platforms they managed to realize their ideas and start a company. Also, it was interesting to hear how important the community in building the company is. Furthermore, to make the project successful it is very important to prepare good campaign material like video and the all story of idea. For donators it has to be clear what the values of the project are and why should they donate.  

Another theme is crowdsourcing. It is an effective way to get the best results. For example, if I need a logotype, I can start a contest on the platform like freelancer.com. After I get many submissions, I can choose the one which suits me the best. That’s how it works. Also, there are other ways how crowdsourcing works.  For example, involving customers and getting feedback is a good way to improve services.

The main advantage is that you can use the mass intelligence, because it can bring a bigger variety of suggestions and ideas. Moreover, by sharing tasks to the mass, works might be done in a shorter time. Also, in websites like freelancer.com people can get services for a lower price than hiring a professional designer. However, you can’t be sure about quality you get. That’s the main disadvantage.

In conclusion, using crowdsourcing and crowdfunding we can make our ideas real and visible. All the success stories based on crowdfunding platforms can just prove it. 

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Posted in Community, Group 3
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Ideas of Viktorija

#5 Teamwork time!

One of the things I hate most is teamwork. I do understand its main assumptions and why it is important, moreover I am willing to admit that the work of many people is far more valuable and simply better than work of one person. But it often happens that making teamwork happen often requires more effort than achieving the purpose individually. It often happens that one person becomes responsible for all the work done, at least in my poor experience with teamwork.  I assumed the key to successful team work is task division and strong leadership of one person, who will motivate and merge the group together. Having no other choice but engage myself in teamwork I guess I have to overcome my reluctance if I want my team to succeed and to be partially responsible for the outcome.

Our team Evolve team consists of 8 people, which is quite a lot. One could expect utter chaos, disorder and no organization, while we experienced something contrary- silence. For many meeting we sat, talking very little, making very little progress. Often some team members skipped meetings,  punctual attendance also wasn’t our strong side. I do not intent to be offensive in any way, I myself had to miss Monday meeting due to health problems. My absence cold cause some difficulties as I had prepared materials for Sheila, our contact person from Gogorobi Foundation and unfortunately I couldn’t post them online that day. But usually our online communication is flawless, we communicate via our Facebook group and we post everything on our shared Google Drive, which has this advantage of providing all team with information about progress and makes everyone part of the work. I don’t think that cultural differences were a great obstacle for us all, we have common goal and that is the thing that we focused on putting the things that vary us aside. Moreover I think that due to those differences we have different skills and perspectives, which with good attitude will be a great addition to our work. Other positives of my group are good research skills, very good organization and involvement: most seems really concerned about the project and we genuinely care about it.

This Monday ( even though I was absent I am aware of our progress due to our great communication!) we divided our team into smaller 2-3 persons units. My is responsible for contact matters with our NGO and fellow groups working on the same project. Now we got clearly divided tasks, each group is defined from A to Z in all dimensions, so each of us had defined duties. That should improve our efficiency, as well as the pressure put on attendance. Now I think we are on the right track and I really expect some results.

 

 

Posted in Community, Group 3
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: ▲▼▲

#5 Teamwork time!

One of the things I hate most is teamwork. I do understand its main assumptions and why it is important, moreover I am willing to admit that the work of many people is far more valuable and simply better than work of one person. But it often happens that making teamwork happen often requires more effort than achieving the purpose individually. It often happens that one person becomes responsible for all the work done, at least in my poor experience with teamwork.  I assumed the key to successful team work is task division and strong leadership of one person, who will motivate and merge the group together. Having no other choice but engage myself in teamwork I guess I have to overcome my reluctance if I want my team to succeed and to be partially responsible for the outcome.

Our team Evolve team consists of 8 people, which is quite a lot. One could expect utter chaos, disorder and no organization, while we experienced something contrary- silence. For many meeting we sat, talking very little, making very little progress. Often some team members skipped meetings,  punctual attendance also wasn’t our strong side. I do not intent to be offensive in any way, I myself had to miss Monday meeting due to health problems. My absence cold cause some difficulties as I had prepared materials for Sheila, our contact person from Gogorobi Foundation and unfortunately I couldn’t post them online that day. But usually our online communication is flawless, we communicate via our Facebook group and we post everything on our shared Google Drive, which has this advantage of providing all team with information about progress and makes everyone part of the work. I don’t think that cultural differences were a great obstacle for us all, we have common goal and that is the thing that we focused on putting the things that vary us aside. Moreover I think that due to those differences we have different skills and perspectives, which with good attitude will be a great addition to our work. Other positives of my group are good research skills, very good organization and involvement: most seems really concerned about the project and we genuinely care about it.

This Monday ( even though I was absent I am aware of our progress due to our great communication!) we divided our team into smaller 2-3 persons units. My is responsible for contact matters with our NGO and fellow groups working on the same project. Now we got clearly divided tasks, each group is defined from A to Z in all dimensions, so each of us had defined duties. That should improve our efficiency, as well as the pressure put on attendance. Now I think we are on the right track and I really expect some results.

 

 

Posted in Community, Group 3
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: ▲▼▲