NOTE: This is a full archive for the Project Community: You & The World (2013) please see the main site for the most up to date information.

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Gems from Albert Einstein in mind map form. You might enjoy…



Gems from Albert Einstein in mind map form. You might enjoy this!

Posted in Community, Faculty
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Nancy's Project Community Reflection

25 Must-Follow NGO Resources on Twitter

25 Must-Follow NGO Resources on Twitter:

Have you gotten interested in NGOs? If you want to keep learning, here are 25 people/organizations on twitter that tweet a lot about technology for good!

Posted in Community, Faculty
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Nancy's Project Community Reflection

“The things I find interesting say something about me. Shared links are like the clothes you wear,…”

“The things I find interesting say something about me. Shared links are like the clothes you wear, they project an image of yourself that you hope some people will find attractive and be drawn to. This process of curating stuff that appeals to you allows you to be found by people who share your interests. This helps start relationships and build networks. This is how you get to do interesting things with interesting people.”

- Good stuff from Euen Semple - read the whole thing at Curatorship — euansemple.com
Posted in Community, Faculty
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Nancy's Project Community Reflection

Data on Millenials

Here is another useful article about YOUR generation. Do you think this reflects you? P2P Foundation’s blog » Blog Archive » The Emerging Collaborative and Sharing Mentalities of the Millenial Generation

“* Jeremiah: What supporting evidence they’re living in the collaborative economy? How are they sharing the physical work, their time, and space around them? Millennials would rather work in a collaborative setting than in cubicles. Companies, such as American Express, understand this need and have programs around it. American Express created BlueWork, which is an innovative program designed to support workplace collaboration and promote flexibility. Employees benefit from being able to work side by side with peers and the company benefits from higher productivity. More millennials, especially entrepreneurs, enjoy co-working spaces because they are inexpensive and let them connect with like minded people. In Boston, for instance, we have Work Bar. When it comes to transportation, research by Zipcar finds that 67% of millennials want media sharing programs, 53% want car sharing programs and 49% want home or vacation sharing programs. Their intent with sharing is to save money because they have students loans and aren’t finding jobs. When it comes to shipping, they do it together and more than older generations. Kit Yarrow and Jayne O’Donnell’s book “Gen Buy” says that 68% of millennials shop with other people at least half the time, while only 44% of older generations can say the same. One thing that we looked at this year was how college students collaborate and we found something quite surprising. 75% of students want to study alone instead of with others and only 20% want to study with friends and classmates in person. Based on my experience with millennials, I believe that technology makes it easier for them to form work groups so they don’t have to meet in person. It’s interesting because you would think they would develop collaboration skills in college and then use the same skills when they get into the workplace. * Jeremiah: Why do they share? What’s in their nature to do this? (Dig in deep here and talk about WHY they share. Maybe look at psychographics and that they’re the first generation on the internet that sharing is a default behavior.) Millennials share out of necessity. They were heavily impacted by the recession and are very slow to recover. They suffer a 16.1% unemployment rate, which is more than twice the national average of 7.4%. Millennials disclose a lot of personal information in order to stay connected with their peers and take advantage of social, economic and political opportunities. As they build their families, they will want to use the internet to keep in touch with them. By 2020, millennials will be more likely to share information online. We did a study for the 2012 elections and found that the second most popular way that millennials followed the election was on social media. They see social media as a way to keep up with what’s going on in the world and other peoples lives.”

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Posted in Community, Faculty
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Nancy's Project Community Reflection

Our learning journey so far and accusations of failure and abandoment

Our learning journey so far and accusations of failure and abandoment:

I strongly recommend taking a read of this story about design, failure and learning. In my work with NGOs over the years, we sometimes start with failures. If we learn from them, we gain insights that get us closer to success. If we hush them up and “sweep them under the table,” the mistakes tend to happen again and again.

Next week one of the three tasks is to think about how your NGO might evaluate the success of their initiatives. You might want to consider how they mitigate for risk, but also maximize for learning…

Posted in Community, Faculty
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Nancy's Project Community Reflection

RSA Replay – Crowdfunding – where next, how far, and what are…



RSA Replay - Crowdfunding - where next, how far, and what are the limits? (by The RSA)

If you are REALLY into crowdfunding, watch this one! (Over an hour long!)

Posted in Community, Faculty
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Nancy's Project Community Reflection

Edu on Tour (by presenteChannel) could be seen as a…



Edu on Tour (by presenteChannel) could be seen as a crowdsourcing approach. How do we learn what is going on to build on it? How do we share what we know. Sometimes we have to step outside of routine. 

I’d love to create such a tour. 

Hm.

Maybe I should plan one for myself. 

Hm. Feeling a bit of inspiration here!!

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Posted in Community, Faculty
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Nancy's Project Community Reflection

The Business Solution to Poverty by Paul Polak , Mal Warwick

The Business Solution to Poverty by Paul Polak , Mal Warwick :

Hey folks, I just learned of this new book, “The Business Solution to Poverty: Designing Products and Services for Three Billion New Customers.

There is a brief intro video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=YvH2PCbjza0

How might your talent and skill in design help provide solutions to poverty? 

Here is the book description:
The nearly three billion people living on $2 a day are not just the world’s greatest challenge—they represent an extraordinary market opportunity. The key is what Paul Polak and Mal Warwick call Zero-Based Design: starting from scratch to create innovative products and services tailored for the very poor, armed with a thorough understanding of what they really want and need and driven by what Polak and Warwick call “the ruthless pursuit of affordability.” Polak has been doing this work for years, and Warwick has extensive experience in both business and philanthropy. Together, they show how their design principles and vision can enable unapologetic capitalists to supply the very poor with clean drinking water, electricity, irrigation, housing, education, health care, and other necessities at a fraction of the usual cost and at profit margins comparable to those of businesses in the developed world. Promising governmental and philanthropic efforts to end poverty have not reached scale because they lack the incentives of the market to attract massive resources. This book opens an extraordinary opportunity for nimble entrepreneurs, investors, and corporate executives that will result not only in vibrant, growing businesses but also a better life for the world’s poorest people.
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Posted in Community, Faculty
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Nancy's Project Community Reflection

Where My Money Dey? Example of design in service of social good

Where My Money Dey? Example of design in service of social good:

This is an amazing site, coded by volunteers which brings together data and makes it visual and useful to communities so they can see if/where/how mining royalties are disbursed back to communities as required by law. Now coding is a form of design - different than industrial design, but this gives you a sense of where imagination and design can create the possibility of public good!

Posted in Community, Faculty
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Nancy's Project Community Reflection

Target’s “Simplicty” Crowdsourcing Campaign

Target's "Simplicty" Crowdsourcing Campaign:

Interesting to see a commercial retail enterprise use a crowdsourcing approach to both problem solving (and along the way, marketing their brand!)

Posted in Community, Faculty
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: Nancy's Project Community Reflection